A Spring Rain Is A Beautiful Thing

Posted on Monday, April 8, 2013 by Andrew

It’s raining today.

It may not make for a great day for a walk, or even that pleasant for driving – but a nice spring rain is a beautiful thing for this farmer.

Good thing I put my rain gauge out yesterday.

A rain gauge can be found on most farms as a way to track how much rain falls from the start of spring to the end of fall.

Mine is certainly not that technologically advanced (although you can get ones that detect the rainfall amount for you). No, this one is simply a system in which Mother Nature fills it up and I dump it out.

b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_20130408_172826.jpgThe amount of rainfall is determined by the lines. Any amount of rain will do, but with a spring shower like this, a nice inch, or about 25mm of rain will be much appreciated. (In this case, it looks like we have had about half a centimetre, or about three-tenths of an inch of rain)

A rain is a beautiful thing to kick start the season. A field of hay (that is being grown for feed for livestock) is just like your lawn, and needs a good rain to wash away all of winter’s dirt and spring new life into each plant.

When the spring rain is a warm one, it can also quickly warm the dirt in a field that will need to be planted over the next few of weeks with crops like oats, corn or soybeans.

By the way – if you ever come across a farmer and don’t know what to say – try “Are you getting enough rain?” That will kick start a great conversation, that all started with a rain gauge.

b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_20130408_172736.jpg

Best to leave the rain gauge out in the open, to get the most accurate reading.

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About Andrew

Social media is becoming a useful tool for many people, and as a farmer, Andrew is no different. Today, Andrew works alongside his parents on their dairy farm, and he started using social media to share the farm’s story with non-farming Ontarians. In addition, he is helping teach farmers and others working in agricultural about the value of social media on the farm.